Did you know that there different crop families?

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asked Jul 5, 2013 by Rosalyn Salmon
John Harrison has told me about six (see below).  Does anyone know of anymore?

Solanaceae - The potato family - potatoes, tomatoes, aubergines

Cruciferae - The cabbage tribe - cabbage, cauliflowers, kale, turnips, radishes, swedes

Umbelliferae - carrots, parsnips, parsley, celery, celeriac

Liliaceae - The Lily family - garlic, onions, shallots, leeks

Leguminosae - The bean family - legumes, anything with bean in it, peas

Cucurbitaceae - The cucurbit family - cucumbers, marrows, courgettes, pumpkins
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1 Answer

+1 vote
answered Jul 6, 2013 by Joan Joyce
There is actually around 170 plant families and over 600 sub categories. plants are grouped around similar characteristics and habits and will go across a range where some will have all parts edible some will have all parts poisonous and some will be part edible. So in the Leguminosae  family for instance, seeds are in pods but not always edible, The yam beam is an example where the seeds are highly poisonous and it is grown for the roots, whereas the American ground nut has both edible root and pod.

The reason why the families are useful is that it help you to identify which family a plant you might not know, belongs to, Knowing this will assist in deciding germination and growing conditions and if you practice crop rotation, where to group them for planting purposes,

By the way there is currently a major international exercise to re-examine the classifications, so the Bean family for instance  is being split into 3  groups, while the carrot/celery (umbelliferae) and cruciferae families among others are being renamed.
Wow thanks Joan, I'll have a look around on the net to get more detail on the different plant families, I had a feeling 6 groups was too easy, lol.

I'll also have a look at the re-examination of the classifications.

Regards

Ros
Great, I wish more people would have a look at this area because it's actually very useful as well as interesting
That is very interesting, I think I will go have a ramble around the internet now :D Thanks.
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